Categories
SQL Server

SQL Server Updates

Updating SQL Server is a topic that infrequently gets sent to the support desk which is surprising given the importance of the applications that depend on a SQL database.

The questions usually being:

  • Is it safe to apply a SQL Server update?
  • Are you responsible for the update or are we?
  • What SQL Server updates are certified/supported with our software?

As of SQL Server 2017 the service pack is no more and the cumulative update now has the same level of validation as what the service packs used to have. This simplifies the update process somewhat. Generally it is safe to install these CUs and Microsoft even encourages you to do so on a “proactive” basis.

Installing an update to SQL Server should always be done with a get-out plan in case something goes wrong during the install. That means a properly tested backup and recovery plan.

I have a default rule that when I approach a job and the client asks me to install SQL Server for them I always apply the latest available cumulative update for testing. After that point the client is handed the responsibility for maintenance of SQL Server including the updates.

Most clients I’ve worked on do not patch SQL Server however most have unknowingly applied a SQL update through some form of Windows update mechanism. It’s not always clear if this is WSUS managed or not.

In an ideal world there would be user-acceptance testing done prior to applying SQL Server updates but many businesses do not have the time or facilities to do so. Regardless of the testing done a cumulative update should not break an application and I would always expect the author to be working with the latest service pack or cumulative update during development and support.

In conclusion patching SQL server is something that should be done on a regular basis and an activity that IT administrators need to be confident about handling.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *